Soft drinks are a regular part of many people’s days. In fact, a Gallup poll found that 48% of Americans drink soda every day and averaged about 2.6 glasses. It was also found that 56% of young adults ages 18-34 drink soda daily. Unfortunately regular consumption of soda and other soft drinks can cause a variety of health issues, such as obesity and type-2 diabetes. Not only do soft drinks pose a threat to your overall health, but they also threaten your oral health as well. 

sugar cubes and tooth

The majority of soft drinks contain copious amounts of sugars. These sugars are then consumed by the bacteria in your mouth, which causes two things to happen. First, the bacteria will produce an acidic waste product that can damage your enamel. Secondly, feeding bacteria allows them to survive, thrive, and reproduce, meaning that they will produce more bacteria. Unfortunately, every sip of a soft drink containing sugar initiates an acid attack that lasts for 20 minutes. Therefore, depending on how often you consume soft drinks, you may be exposing your teeth to constant acid attacks. 

Not only do soft drinks contain sugars, but certain sodas contain citric and phosphoric acid. This means that you are exposing your teeth to both acid and sugars that are processed into acid. As a result, one of two things can happen: 

Erosion

The first thing that can happen is dental erosion. Enamel erosion occurs when the acids in soft drinks cause the enamel to demineralize and wear down. The more acid exposure, the thinner the enamel will become over time. Sodas are a common cause or erosion, but sports drinks and fruit juices have also been known to erode enamel. 

Cavities 

When the enamel is weakened, your teeth are more susceptible to developing cavities. In fact, as the bacteria continue to reproduce and congregate in a certain area, a concentration of acid waste products is likely to cause a cavity to form. Soda is a primary contributor to cavities because of its acid and sugar content. 

Soft drink with a straw

At this point, you may be wondering about sugar-free soft drinks. Surely, those are good for your teeth, right? They are slightly better because they don’t contain sugar, however sugar-free soft drinks still pose a threat to your oral health. This is because even though things like diet sodas don’t contain sugar, they still contain a similar acid content to regular sodas. Unfortunately, sports drinks, pure orange juice, and wine all contain enough acid to raise the pH level and be potentially harmful. 

However, this does not necessarily mean that you have to eliminate soft drinks from your diet altogether, although it probably would be much better for you if you did. There are steps you can take to protect your teeth while enjoying your favorite soft drinks. The first step is to practice moderation and limit the amount of soft drinks you consume. Next, using a straw can help avoid contact with your teeth. Finally, using milk or water as a chaser can help decrease acidity levels. 

Overall, soft drinks pose an unfortunate risk to your oral health as a result of their high sugar and acid content. The regular consumption of soft drinks can cause your enamel to erode over time and can even lead to the development of dental cavities. In order to prevent these things from happening, it is important to limit the amount of soft drinks you consume and take necessary steps to reduce the risk to your oral health. 

Dr. Pasha Smiling

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

Do you have a tooth that is severely damaged or decayed? Do you have a root canal coming up? Are you wanting to cover up a tooth permanently discolored from past trauma? If any of these questions apply to you, then your dentist may recommend having a dental crown placed. Dental crowns are tooth-shaped caps that fit over your natural tooth to restore its appearance and function. 

When it comes to dental crowns, there are several different materials to choose from. There can also be various types of each material, depending on what your dentist has to offer. With so many options available, it can be hard to know which one to pick. Nowadays, the ideal dental crown is one that is both durable and aesthetic. If these are two of the most important factors to you, then a Bruxzir crown is the way to go. 

Bruxzir crowns are a type of ceramic crown that is made from zirconium oxide, also known as zirconia. This material is rapidly increasing in popularity and is not only used for crowns, but for bridges, inlays/onlays, implant-supported crowns and dentures, and veneers. At this point you are probably wondering what is so great about Bruxzir crowns. Here are a few reasons why a Bruxzir crown is one of the best dental crowns: 

Strength

Bruxzir crowns are fabricated out of solid zirconia, which is the strongest ceramic dental material. Unlike other types of ceramic crowns, Bruxzir crowns do not have a porcelain coating. This ultimately means that they are not prone to chipping like all-porcelain crowns. They are even strong enough to endure the extra force of bruxers. In fact, Bruxzir crowns are so strong that they can withstand the force of a hammer. Don’t believe me? Check out this video!.

Can Reduce Wear

After that video, you might be wondering what a Bruxzir crown will do to your opposing teeth. Although Bruxzir crowns can cause some opposing enamel wear, there are few modifications that can be made to reduce wear and preserve the opposing enamel. The first way is to have your dentist request that your crown be polished, rather than glazed. Diamond polishing Bruxzir crowns has shown to be an effective way of reducing wear on the opposing teeth. However, this means the crown itself may not look as nice as it would have with the glaze. 

Appearance 

Each Bruxzir crown is precisely fabricated using CAD/CAM technology from a dental impression or digital scan of a patient’s mouth. After the crown has been milled to the exact dimensions specified, it will be placed in a oven to sinter for 9 hours. It will then be sandblasted to smooth out the surface, then stained and glazed. The technique used to stain and glaze the crown gives it a natural, translucent appearance. Each crown is also color matched to the requested shade to ensure it is the proper color. These steps taken during fabrication mean that the final result is flawless. 

Better Fit

The careful fabrication process of Bruxzir crowns also means that they will fit better than other types of dental crowns. While many dental crowns have a “speed bump” or excess material between the crown and the natural tooth structure, Bruxzir crowns have a feather edge. This means that a dental explorer tool cannot feel where the crown ends and the tooth begins. Not only will this make the crown look more natural, but it will be more comfortable as well. 

As you can see, there are a few very compelling reasons why Bruxzir crowns are the best dental crown available today. For starters, they are ridiculously strong without causing much wear on opposing teeth. They are also fabricated to both look and feel like natural teeth. If you are looking for an ideal dental crown, then ask your dentist if Bruxzir crowns are right for you. 

Dr. Pasha Smiling

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

Dental cleanings are essential preventative procedures used to maintain your oral health by decreasing the risk of tooth decay and gum disease. The American Dental Association recommends visiting your local dental office at least once every six months to have a dental cleaning. However many people have busy schedules and may tell themselves they simply don’t have time to go to the dentist. 

Luckily, your general dentist can complete routine cleanings quicker than you think. In most cases, a professional teeth cleaning procedure can be completed in as little as 30 minutes! This means that you can squeeze a dental cleaning into your lunch break if need be. However, how long your dental cleaning takes will depend on the type of dental cleaning you are having. 

The vast majority of people who visit the dentist for a cleaning will need what is called a prophylaxis cleaning. Although this may sound complicated, prophylaxis simply means “to prevent disease”. Therefore, this type of cleaning is a simple preventative dental cleaning. 

dental scaler

During a prophylaxis cleaning, a dental hygienist will use a dental scaler to gently scrape excess dental plaque and tartar from your teeth. The difference between plaque and tartar is that tartar is hardened plaque that can only be removed with a dental scaler. Plaque, on the other hand, is softer and can be removed with regular brushing and flossing. Since both plaque and tartar are responsible for causing tooth decay and gum disease, removing them from the tooth’s surface helps to prevent these issues from occurring. 

After using the scaler, your hygienist will brush your teeth with a gritty toothpaste and floss in between them to remove any remaining debris. Your teeth will then be rinsed and treated with fluoride. Fluoride is topically applied and works to strengthen tooth enamel and make it harder for plaque to stick to the enamel. 

Every type of dental cleaning will begin with a basic prophylaxis cleaning. However, if you are affected by gum disease, haven’t had a cleaning in several years, or have excessive tartar deposits on your teeth, you will likely require an additional, specialized cleaning. In these cases, your dental cleaning appointment will take longer and can last about an hour or so, depending how extensive a cleaning is required. 

normal tooth vs. periodontitis

One commonly performed specialized cleaning is known as a deep cleaning, or scaling and root planing. Used to treat gum disease, this type of cleaning uses a dental scaler to clean in the gum pockets, as well as along the tooth root. This is a common location for plaque accumulation. Unfortunately when plaque accumulates here, it causes the gums to become infected and they will then start pulling away from the teeth, or receding. After plaque is removed, the root surface will be smoothed in order to encourage the gums to reattach. 

If you are affected by an advanced form of gum disease called periodontitis, you will need what is known as a periodontal maintenance cleaning. This type of cleaning is basically a scaling and root planing cleaning scheduled at a more frequent rate than the typical every six months. This is because frequent periodontal cleanings help to keep plaque populations under control to prevent the disease from progressing. 

The final type of cleaning is one that very few people require. Called a gross debridement, this type of cleaning is used when there are significant amounts of tartar buildup on the enamel. Because gross debridement cleanings usually require the use of anesthetics and highly specialized dental tools, they are generally performed over the course of multiple dental appointments. Out of all the types of dental cleanings, this type takes the longest. 

Overall, most dental cleanings are quick preventative dental procedures that can be completed in about 30 minutes to an hour. By only sacrificing an hour every six months, you can greatly reduce your risk of dental issues and keep your smile healthy. However, more involved cleanings can take longer, so you may need to discuss what type of cleaning your dentist recommends so you can plan accordingly. 

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

Family dentists are concerned with helping your entire family take care of their teeth and they offer many preventative dentistry services. These services are intended to prevent serious dental issues by strengthening tooth enamel and controlling bacteria levels in the mouth. However since your local family dentist sees patients of all ages with a variety of different dental needs, they offer more than just your preventative teeth cleaning. 

Dental sealant on molars

One preventative treatment that family dentists offer that you may or may not be aware of, are dental sealants. Dental sealants are thin coats of composite resin that are brushed onto the chewing surface of molars. Once hardened, sealants do as their name suggests and seal the tooth. This reduces bacteria’s ability to erode tooth enamel and decreases the risk of tooth decay.  Like other preventative dental treatments, sealants are a cheap dental treatment when compared to restorative services. 

Dental sealants are a popular pediatric dentistry treatment and are often recommended for young children. This is because young children often struggle to brush and floss properly. Since the molars have many grooves and are in the back of the mouth, young children may not adequately clean them. Placing a dental sealant helps to decrease their risk for tooth decay while they’re still learning how to properly take care of their teeth. 

Although they are commonly used in children, dental sealants can also be used for adults. They are ideal for adults with special needs or mobility issues that hinder an individual’s ability to properly care for their teeth. They can also be beneficial for geriatric dental care and can be used for seniors as well. 

While dental sealants can help prevent dental issues in children, adults, and seniors, they are only effective if they are in good condition. Like other dental treatments, sealants do not last forever and they will eventually need to be replaced. Therefore, one must consider how long dental sealants last. 

However, sealants are slightly different than other dental treatments in that they can last up to nine years, but may not be effective that entire time. Research has shown that sealants offer the greatest level of protection in the first four years after their initial application. After four years, they are still slightly effective, but their effectiveness will decrease for every year they are left in place. 

For this reason, your family dentist generally recommends replacing sealants four years after their initial placement. In some cases, your dentist may opt to keep them in place for longer if they are still in good condition. Regular dental checkups every six months allow your dentist to regularly evaluate the condition of sealants to determine when they need to be replaced. Replacing dental sealants is important because not only are damaged sealants no longer effective, but bacteria can become trapped under the sealant and cause tooth decay. 

Overall, dental sealants are an effective, preventative, and cheap dental treatment that lasts up to nine years. They can be used on children, adults, and seniors as a way of reducing tooth decay in the molars. To maintain the benefits of sealants, your family dentist will likely recommend to schedule regular dental checkups every six months and to replace the sealant after four years. 

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

Dental crown model

If you have a tooth that is chipped, cracked, or decayed, your dentist will likely recommend a dental crown to protect the remaining tooth structure and restore function. A dental crown is a hollow cap that fits over the top of an existing tooth in order to protect it and provide stability. In some cases, dental crowns are also used in coordination with dental implants and are adhered to the abutment piece. 

There are many different types of crowns and you can learn more about them here. However, this particular article is going to focus on porcelain fused to metal crowns. Porcelain fused to metal crowns, also known simply as PFM crowns, are fabricated with a metal-alloy interior and a porcelain exterior. This allows them to have the strength of metal crowns combined with the aesthetics of porcelain crowns. Let’s take a look at the advantages and disadvantages of PFM crowns, as well as their preparation. 

Porcelain Fused to Metal Crown Advantages

PFM crown

Porcelain Fused to Metal Crown Disadvantages

Porcelain Fused to Metal Crown Preparation

To place a PFM crown, your dentist must first prepare your tooth. To keep you comfortable, you will be anesthetized to make the area numb. Some dentists also offer dental sedation to keep you relaxed during the procedure. To prepare the tooth, your dentist will first remove any decayed tissue. Depending on the amount of tissue removed, your dentist may also need to build your tooth up in certain places. During this process, your dentist will also be shaping your tooth so that it can accommodate a PFM crown. Shaping will generally consist of removing enamel from some areas and building up the tooth in other areas. 

Once the tooth has been prepared, a dental impression will be taken and sent to a dental lab. Since it may be a week or two before your permanent PFM crown is ready, your dentist will place a temporary crown over your tooth. Temporary crowns are generally made from stainless steel and will likely not fit as well as your permanent crown. When your permanent crown is ready, the temporary crown will be removed and the PFM crown will be adhered to your tooth. 

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

Whether you’ve lost a tooth from past dental trauma or due to decay or damage, any dentist will tell you that it is important to have said tooth replaced sooner rather than later. Replacing missing teeth is essential to maintain proper alignment of the teeth, as well as an even bite. For these reasons, general dentists offer a variety of restorative treatments specifically aimed at replacing missing teeth. 

One of these options is known as a dental bridge. Like their name suggests, dental bridges use a pontic, or fake tooth, to bridge the gap left by a missing tooth. Depending on the number of teeth missing, multiple pontics may be used to replace multiple missing teeth in the same area of the mouth. However in order for a dental bridge to be placed, there must be healthy teeth on either side of the gap that are strong enough to support the dental bridge. 

If you’ve decided upon a dental bridge to replace missing teeth, there are four different types of dental bridges your general dentist may offer you. In some cases, one type may be better suited for you than another, so your dentist will likely only recommend those that will work well for your case. The four different types of dental bridges include: 

Traditional dental bridge

Traditional

Traditional dental bridges are made up of a pontic supported by dental crowns on either side that placed on natural teeth. Out of all the different types of bridges, traditional bridges are the most commonly used. When placing this type of bridge, the teeth on either side of the gap must be reduced in size so that a dental crown can be placed over the top. The permanent restoration will be fused together as a single piece that is then adhered to the supporting teeth. 

Maryland Bonded Dental Bridge

Maryland Bonded

This type of bridge uses the same basic structure of a traditional dental bridge. However, instead of supporting the pontic with dental crowns on either side, Maryland Bonded bridges use a metal framework instead. This metal framework is usually adhered to the back of the teeth on either side of the gap. However, certain cases may also have a metal framework that wraps around certain teeth. 

Cantilever Dental Bridge

Cantilever

Cantilever bridges are not often used because they are not as strong as other dental bridges. This is because they are only supported using a crown on a single adjacent tooth, rather than being supported by a dental crown on either side. In some cases, they are able to be used to replace a single missing tooth in the front of the mouth. When they are used, cantilever bridges tend to be more affordable and easier to place. 

Implant-Supported Dental Bridge

Implant-Supported

Implant-supported dental bridges use the same basic structure as a traditional dental bridge, however the surrounding dental crowns are supported by dental implants rather than natural teeth. This type of bridge is often used when the surrounding teeth have been structurally compromised by decay or damage in a way that makes them unable to support a dental crown. Instead, these teeth can be extracted and replaced with dental implants. An implant-supported bridge is also used in cases where there are multiple adjacent teeth missing. 

Overall, if you have missing teeth and are considering a dental bridge, you have the option of choosing between traditional, Maryland bonded, Cantilever, and implant-supported bridges. Each type of dental bridges offers similar structure, however allows for different means of support. Ultimately, a general dentist will assess your individual case to help you select the best type of dental bridge for your smile. 

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

Although the term “dental crown” makes it sound like a tiny crown for your tooth, dental crowns are caps that fit over the tooth. Dental crowns are called as such because they fit over the visible portion of the tooth, which is called the crown. They are a restorative dental prosthesis used to restore decayed and damaged teeth that require additional support for maintaining their function. They are also commonly used in coordination with dental implants to fill in gaps left by missing teeth. 

Since dental crowns are placed over an existing tooth, the natural tooth structure must be reduced and shaped for the artificial crown to keep the bite even once the crown has been placed. While the affected tooth is reduced and shaped, the tooth and surrounding area will be numb. After the tooth has been properly prepared, a dental impression or oral scan will be taken. This information is then sent to a dental laboratory or used with an in-office milling machine to fabricate the dental crown. Once the permanent dental crown is complete, it will be checked for fit and cemented into the mouth. 

Here are the five different types of dental crowns: 

All-Resin Dental Crowns

In the short-term, all-resin dental crowns are one of the most affordable dental crowns. They are fabricated from dental composite resin and can be color-matched to blend in with the surrounding teeth. They also require minimal tooth preparation. However, they are not always the best long-term solution because they are weaker than other types of dental crowns and more susceptible to damage. 

All-Porcelain Dental Crowns

All-porcelain dental crowns, also sometimes referred to as all-ceramic crowns, are fabricated using porcelains and ceramics. They are entirely metal-free and are a good choice for those with allergies to metal. Porcelain crowns can be color-matched to the teeth and are sometimes used for cosmetic dental treatments to improve the size, shape, or color of teeth. However, porcelain crowns lack the strength of metal and PFM crowns, and they have been known to wear down the opposing teeth. 

PFM Crowns Shown in a Dental Bridge
PFM Crowns Shown in a Dental Bridge

Porcelain Fused to Metal Dental Crowns

Porcelain fused to metal crowns, more simply known as PFM crowns, are fabricated using a metal base with porcelain fused over the top. The final result is a dental crown that looks porcelain, but has the strength of a metal crown. PFM crowns are popular choices for individuals who want to avoid the metallic look of a metal crown, but desire the strength. However, the porcelain can cause faster wear on opposing teeth and the metal ring may be visible if the gums recede.  

Metal Dental Crowns

Zirconia crowns shown in a dental bridge
Zirconia crowns shown in a dental bridge

Metal dental crowns are entirely made out of metal and have a metallic appearance. There are different metals that can be used to fabricate metal crowns, including gold, platinum, copper, and base metals such as cobalt-chromium and nickel-chromium. In most cases, metal crowns are a mix of a precious metal with a base metal alloy. Metal crowns are an ideal choice for restoring molars because they are extremely strong, but do not wear out the opposing teeth. In the back of the mouth, they are also not visible when smiling. In addition to their metallic appearance, another downside of metal crowns is the fact that they corrode over time. 

However, a new type of metal crown has been introduced called a Bruxzir crown. Bruxzir crowns are fabricated from zirconia, which is a member of the titanium family. In most cases, Bruxzir crowns are offered as same day dental crowns that have the strength of metal, an aesthetic appearance, and are porcelain-free. 

Stainless Steel Dental Crowns

Stainless steel dental crowns are used mainly for restoring primary teeth in children that have undergone pulp therapy, or baby root canals. They do not last long and are intended to be lost with the primary tooth. If a temporary crown is needed to protect the tooth between its preparation and the placement of the permanent crown, then a stainless steel crown may also be used. 

The five different types of dental crowns, all-resin, all-porcelain, porcelain fused to metal, metal, and stainless steel, each offer a slightly different approach to restoring damaged and decayed teeth. Certain materials may work better than others for certain cases, so speaking with a general dentist is the best way to determine which type of dental crown is best suited to your needs. Although dental crowns are not tiny crowns for your teeth, they are still an important accessory that sits on top of your tooth. 

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

Besides preserving your oral health, one of the main goals of modern dentistry is to make dental procedures as comfortable as possible. With the introduction of dental sedation and dental anesthetics in the 19th and 20th centuries, dental procedures became more comfortable than ever before. Still, there is always room for improvement. 

In 1989, the first dental lasers were introduced as a tool used by dentists to provide patients with the best that modern dentistry had to offer. Recently, more and more dentists have begun to implement the use of dental lasers in their dental practices. However, patients who have never undergone dental treatment with a laser may be skeptical at first. Nevertheless, treatment with dental lasers has many benefits. Here are five reasons to try laser dentistry at your next dental appointment: 

Woman sleeping in dental chair

Eases Dental Anxiety

Unfortunately, dental anxiety is a very real problem that has a number of causes. One common cause is fear of the dental drill and its accompanying sounds. While dental drills are essential in many dental treatments, they are very loud and cause a vibrating sensation. Dental lasers, on the other hand, are much quieter and do not produce the same type of vibration. Furthermore, there are certain treatments, such as treating cavities, that can use a dental laser in place of a dental drill. For many patients, this allows them to finally relax in the dentist’s chair. 

Gentle Dentistry

Dental procedures performed with dental lasers are also more comfortable overall. This is due to the way the laser works. Dental lasers emit a strong beam of light that simultaneously removes or reshapes tissue, as well as sealing the wound and nerve endings. By sealing the nerve endings at the same time the tissue is altered, painful sensations are dramatically reduced. This allows for a more gentle dental treatment that often does not require the use of anesthetics or sedation. 

Minimal Bleeding

An unfortunate part of dental treatments that affect the soft tissues is bleeding. Since blood is another source of anxiety for many, dental lasers offer an alternative with less bleeding. As mentioned before, dental lasers use a strong beam of light to perform multiple functions all at one time. One of these functions is to seal the wound. By sealing the wound, dental lasers cause the blood to clot almost instantly, which significantly limits the amount of bleeding that occurs. 

Woman in striped shirt smiling with red lipstick

Easier Recovery

Recovering after a treatment performed with a dental laser is often easier and faster. This is because their is less pain and bleeding during treatment, so there is also less pain and little to no bleeding after treatment. Additionally, the wound cauterization process that clots the blood acts as a catalyst for the body’s natural healing response. This way, healing begins as soon as the treatment is over and recovery is shorter. 

Decreased Chance of Complications

Dental lasers possess a precision unlike any other dental tool. Their light beam is both focused and concentrated on a specific area. This minimizes the chances of causing trauma to the surrounding structures. In addition to limiting bleeding, the laser beam also sterilizes the tissue during treatment, which reduces the chance of infection. All these factors combined decrease the overall risk of post-treatment complications. 

By easing dental anxiety, providing gentle dentistry, minimizing bleeding, making recovery easier, and decreasing the chance of complications, laser dentistry is quickly setting itself apart from other types of dental techniques. Although dental technology will continue to develop, laser dentistry is definitely the dentistry of the future. For more information about laser dentistry, see Solea Dental Laser.

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

General dentistry is the practice of providing dental services that identify, diagnose, treat, and prevent dental issues. Because of their expansive skillset, general dentists can provide their patients with a range of preventative, restorative, and cosmetic dental services. Not only that, but general dentists can choose to have a diverse age range of their patients. When general dentists offer dental services to toddlers, children, adults, and seniors, they are commonly referred to as Family Dentists. 

Seeing a family dentist for your family’s dental needs has many benefits. To give you a better idea, here are five reasons to see a family dentist: 

Convenience

A family dentist can see your entire family. This means that you only have one location to go to for everyone’s dental appointments. You can even schedule everyone’s appointments on the same day. This way you won’t find yourself running around endlessly driving from office to office. Seeing a family dentist can simplify your life and save you time. 

family appointment at the dentist

Teaches Your Children Good Dental Habits

Since everyone’s appointments are in one place, your children can accompany you to the dentist. During your appointment, you can act as an example for your children so they know what to expect during their appointment. This also teaches them the importance of regular dental visits and helps them feel more secure about dental visits in general. To learn more about what to expect at your appointment, see “Dental Consultation & Cleaning” and “Your Child’s First Visit”.

Familiar With Your Dental Health

Seeing the same dentist from childhood into adulthood means that they will be familiar with your oral health and your specific needs. All your past dental x-rays and dental records will be in one place, which allows them to have easy access to them if needed. Keeping track of your dental history can be difficult when you have to transfer x-rays and records from office to office.  Furthermore, your family dentist will also be familiar with your family’s medical history, which can help them prevent certain types of dental issues that can be inherited

Personalized Dental Care

Dentists who regularly see families are generally very compassionate and have experience providing their patients with personalized dental care. Often family dentists value the family structure and are happy to serve the different generations of a single family.  Since they are dedicated to providing every member of your family with a good experience, they will often change their approach based on the needs of the patient. 

Comprehensive Dental Care

Not only do family dentists offer personalized dental care, but they also offer comprehensive dental care. This means that they can offer a variety of dental services that can benefit children all the way to seniors. Their broad experience also allows them to provide specialized dental services such as periodontics, endodontics, and orthodontics. With a family dentist, your dental needs may change, but your dentist doesn’t have to. 

As you can see, there are many compelling reasons to visit a family dentist. Family dentist’s offer convenient, personal, and comprehensive care for yourself and your family. Their familiarity with your family also allows them to more accurately diagnose possible dental issues and helps your children to feel at ease during dental visits. If you are looking to make your life easier while still providing your family with the very best, schedule a consultation with a family dentist today!

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

It is no secret that modern dentistry can be expensive. Often, the cost of dental treatments is one of the main obstacles preventing people form seeking the dental care they need. However, it is possible to visit the dentist without having to worry about paying off a large bill.

The best way to accomplish this is to not put off going to the dentist. In most cases, dental issues that are detected earlier can be treated easier and require less-invasive and more affordable treatments. Another way to keep your dental costs down is to keep up with preventative dental visits and daily oral hygiene. Both will minimize the occurrence and severity of dental issues.

Eventually, however, a trip to the dentist will be required at some point. While the treatment best for you can only be determined by a dentist, here are some cheap dental treatments that can help to maintain or restore your oral health:

Woman having her teeth cleaned

#1: Teeth Cleanings

Teeth cleaning procedures remove plaque and tartar from the surface of your teeth in order to reduce bacteria populations in your mouth. Reduced levels of bacteria mean a reduced chance of developing both tooth decay and gum disease. Both tooth decay and gum disease are commonly associated with required restorative care, so preventing these things will help you avoid the cost associated with restorative procedures. For more information on how to prevent tooth decay, see “Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know About Cavities”. If you have dental insurance, your teeth cleanings should be covered and should not cost you anything. Even if you don’t have dental insurance, dental cleanings only cost an average of $75-$200 (source: Authority Dental).

Dental Sealant in a tube

#2: Dental Sealants

Dental sealants are a thin coating that is applied to the highly textured chewing surface of molars. They “seal” the tooth and prevent bacteria from coming in contact with the tooth’s enamel. They are applied to the molars because the various pits and fissures on molars are common locations for bacteria to accumulate and cause tooth decay. Sealants are especially beneficial for children who are still learning proper oral hygiene. They are also ideal for individuals that struggle brushing their back teeth or maintaining a daily dental routine. Dental sealants are highly affordable and can help to prevent tooth decay entirely. On average, dental sealants cost about $30-$60 per tooth (source: Healthline)

Three types of dental fillings: gold, silver, and composite

#3: Dental Fillings

Despite preventative efforts, there may still be cases that require restorative dental procedures. With restorative dentistry, generally the earlier the problem is detected, the more affordable the treatment is. When tooth decay occurs, one of the first steps is to have the cavity filled. Compared to other restorative dental treatments, dental fillings are more affordable. They can also be made more affordable by the type of dental material used. For example, the average cost of an amalgam (metal) filling is about $110-$275, while the average cost of a composite resin filling is about $135-$325 per filling (Source: Consumer Guide to Dentistry).

As you can see, not all dental treatments have to cost you a large amount of money. Preventative treatments are especially affordable and have the benefit of reducing the risk for more extensive and expensive procedures later down the line. Even if restorative treatment is required, catching it early leads to lower costs for basic restorative treatments, such as dental fillings. Dental treatment can be made even more affordable through the use of certain dental materials and dental insurance. With these dental treatments, you can be sure to save both your teeth and your wallet.

Dr. Pasha Javaheri Saatchi attended Boston University School of Dental Medicine for four years, ultimately landing him back in New York City for his one-year residency at Staten Island University Hospital. Pasha’s office also has quite an interesting history, opening in 1960 with Dr. Felder, then being bought out in 1995 by Dr. Zomick, and finally being established as Pasha Dental in 2010. Pasha is proud to say he still sees some of Dr. Felder’s patients to this day and has even treated four generations of the same family!

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